Stephen Miller Is an Immigration Hypocrite. I Know Because I’m His Uncle. – POLITICO Magazine

If my nephew’s ideas on immigration had been in force a century ago, our family would have been wiped out.

Source: Stephen Miller Is an Immigration Hypocrite. I Know Because I’m His Uncle. – POLITICO Magazine

Such an appeal to people like Stephen Miller and Trump is futile. They are unencumbered by the need for philosophical/moral/logical consistency. Hitler, when faced with the possibility that he might have Jewish ancestry, is said to have defined “Jewishness” in Nazi law to exclude himself specifically:

In 1933, the London Daily Mirror published a picture of a gravestone in a Jewish cemetery in Bucharest inscribed with some Hebrew characters and the name Adolf Hitler, but this Bucharest Hitler could not have been the Nazi leader’s grandfather. At the time, though, this picture sufficiently worried Hitler that he had the Nazi law defining Jewishness written to exclude Jesus Christ and himself.

Mehdi Hasan Interviews Abdul El-Sayed, Progressive Candidate in Michigan’s Democratic Primary

He’s been called the new Obama. Abdul El-Sayed, a 33-year-old doctor and health policy expert, has never held elected office. But he’s running to be governor of Michigan — and if the size of his rallies is anything to go by, this charismatic and progressive insurgent could pull off a huge upset in the Democratic gubernatorial primary on August 7.

The former director of Detroit’s Health Department, El-Sayed supports “Medicare for All,” making college tuition-free, and raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour. He’s been endorsed by both Sen. Bernie Sanders and democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the shock winner of the Democratic primary in New York’s 14th Congressional District, who has come out to Michigan to campaign for him.

He has also been endorsed by Michael Moore and many others: abdulformichigan.com/endorsements

Meet the Activists Behind the Movement to Abolish ICE

https://theslot.jezebel.com/what-the-movement-to-abolish-ice-looks-like-on-the-grou-1827825182

Judging by the coverage, it looks as though the idea to abolish ICE sprang out of the head of some aide to Kirsten Gillibrand, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, or Cynthia Nixon, all of whom have spoken out about the need to dismantle the agency.

Curiously, less attention has been paid to the immigrant rights activists who fought the creation of ICE when it was proposed in 2002 and have challenged the agency, calling for it—and its founding mission—to be defunded. These are the same people doing the work today, and yet their voices are absent from much of what has been published in the past few weeks. (One excellent exception is this piece from The Nation, which features thoughtful commentary by organizers from groups like Detention Watch Network, Project South, and Mijente.)

Link

… in the El Paso County Jail in Colorado, Sheriff’s Deputy Sandra Rincon was celebrated with a tiara, a “princess” plate, and a cake with the number “50” on top. The number, however, wasn’t her age. It referred to the number of times she had used force against prisoners, ranging from handcuffing to punching and kicking. She was the winner of what one of the county jailers called a “fight club,” crowning whoever used force most often as the champion.

The uncovering of the “fight club” did lead to an investigation, but that investigation fell far short of being genuine and robust. The investigation largely minimized the culture of violence that led to the “fight club” coming to be in the first place. There were written reprimands, but no demotions, no transfers, or dock of pay for anyone involved, and there was no other disciplinary action along the lines of limited suspension. The competition was dismissed as little more than “bad judgment,” and the county denied that it resulted in increased use of force, even though incidents of use of force nearly doubled during the first two years of the competition.

El Paso County Deputies Started a Fight Club to Reward Use of Force Against Prisoners | American Civil Liberties Union

The War in Afghanistan Is Still Not Going Well, Forcing Washington to Order Yet Another Review of U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan

matthewaid:

July 10, 2018

After discouraging year, U.S. officials expect review of Afghan strategy

Reuters

July 10, 2018

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States is preparing to undertake a review of its strategy in Afghanistan, U.S. officials told Reuters, a year after President Donald Trump begrudgingly agreed to extend America’s involvement in the 17-year-old war.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to the coalition forces at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan July 9, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via Reuters

Officials said Trump has shown signs of frustration over the lack of progress since he unveiled a strategy last August that committed to an open-ended deployment of U.S. military advisers, trainers and special forces and increased air support for Afghan security forces. The goal was to force the Taliban militants to open peace talks with the Kabul government.

Trump was opposed to remaining in America’s longest war, but was convinced by his advisers to give it more time. He authorized last year the deployment an additional 3,000 U.S. troops, bringing the total to around 15,000.

Nearly a year later, the current situation is in a stalemate in which Afghan civilians are paying a heavy toll, the Taliban are expanding in rural areas but are unable to capture major urban centers and the capability of Afghan security forces remains in doubt.

Several current U.S. officials and other former officials and advisers with direct knowledge said the White House had not yet formally ordered the review, but they were preparing for a government-wide appraisal in the next few months.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the issue.

“We’ve received some indications from the White House that Trump could ask for a review in the next few months. So we’re preparing for what it would look like,” said a senior U.S. official.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani accompanied by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at a news conference at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, July 9, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via Reuters

The review would examine all facets of the current strategy, including what progress had been made, the U.S. troops presence, and prospect of negotiations with the Taliban. It also would include U.S. relations with Pakistan, which U.S. officials accuse of supporting the insurgents, the senior official said. Islamabad denies the charge.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

LONGEST WAR

U.S.-led forces invaded Afghanistan in 2001 to topple the Taliban government for harboring al-Qaeda.

Since then, nearly 1,900 U.S. troops have been killed in the war, even as corruption remains endemic in the country and security remains precarious. A recent U.S. government watchdog report found that the Afghan government controlled or influenced only 56 percent of country.

Trump has vented over the lack of progress in Afghanistan, other officials told Reuters, also on the condition of anonymity.

“The president has asked repeatedly what progress we’ve made in Afghanistan since he made his decision, and how much we’ve invested there since 2001,” said one senior official with first-hand knowledge of the ongoing debate over Afghan policy.

“He’s voiced his frustration about the lack of progress many, many times, basically asking ‘What have we got for all that money?’”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks to the coalition forces at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan July 9, 2018. Andrew Harnik/Pool via Reuters

Michael Kugelman, a South Asia specialist at the Woodrow Wilson Center, said that if there had meaningful progress in Afghanistan, a review would be unlikely.

“The administration could essentially say (after the review) that the conditions have not improved on the ground, so what is the reason to stay,” Kugelman said.

It is not unprecedented for the White House to request such an internal review. Officials said a similar review was carried out after President Barack Obama unveiled an Afghanistan strategy in 2009.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on a surprise visit to Afghanistan on Monday, promised support for President Ashraf Ghani’s bid to start peace talks with the Taliban and repeated the United States would be willing to take part.

He said the strategy announced last year was working, and would reassure Afghans “that we will support them as they continue fighting to liberate their country and their people.”

Link

Globalization has come to Ethiopia in the form of the garment industry. This time it looks shiny, is housed in robust buildings and even uses renewable energy – because it is cheap. Still, the tradition of a much-less-than-living wage for the workers is maintained, as is the tradition of taking advantage of the host country’s need for development to strong-arm it into providing special benefits and breaks.

This is a “fascinating” glimpse of how globalization comes to be implemented in the Global South. The immediate effect on the local economy turns out to be undesirable for all parties – some more than others of course.

Ethiopia Touts Good Conditions in Factories for Brands Like H&M and Calvin Klein, but Workers Scrape By on $1 a Day

Link

In its investigation, the United Nations found government forces and
those aligned with them killed at least 232 civilians and raped 120
women and girls in a recent spate of attacks on opposition-held
villages, in what may amount to war crimes. Dozens of those killed —
including children, the disabled and the elderly — were burned alive. At
least one of the gang-rape victims was as young as 6. Opposition troops
were also responsible for killing a number of civilians, and the
investigation identified three individuals who the report says bear the
“greatest responsibility” for the violent incidents the United Nations
documented.

South Sudanese troops raped and killed hundreds in recent attacks, U.N. investigation finds