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… in the El Paso County Jail in Colorado, Sheriff’s Deputy Sandra Rincon was celebrated with a tiara, a “princess” plate, and a cake with the number “50” on top. The number, however, wasn’t her age. It referred to the number of times she had used force against prisoners, ranging from handcuffing to punching and kicking. She was the winner of what one of the county jailers called a “fight club,” crowning whoever used force most often as the champion.

The uncovering of the “fight club” did lead to an investigation, but that investigation fell far short of being genuine and robust. The investigation largely minimized the culture of violence that led to the “fight club” coming to be in the first place. There were written reprimands, but no demotions, no transfers, or dock of pay for anyone involved, and there was no other disciplinary action along the lines of limited suspension. The competition was dismissed as little more than “bad judgment,” and the county denied that it resulted in increased use of force, even though incidents of use of force nearly doubled during the first two years of the competition.

El Paso County Deputies Started a Fight Club to Reward Use of Force Against Prisoners | American Civil Liberties Union

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Globalization has come to Ethiopia in the form of the garment industry. This time it looks shiny, is housed in robust buildings and even uses renewable energy – because it is cheap. Still, the tradition of a much-less-than-living wage for the workers is maintained, as is the tradition of taking advantage of the host country’s need for development to strong-arm it into providing special benefits and breaks.

This is a “fascinating” glimpse of how globalization comes to be implemented in the Global South. The immediate effect on the local economy turns out to be undesirable for all parties – some more than others of course.

Ethiopia Touts Good Conditions in Factories for Brands Like H&M and Calvin Klein, but Workers Scrape By on $1 a Day

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In its investigation, the United Nations found government forces and
those aligned with them killed at least 232 civilians and raped 120
women and girls in a recent spate of attacks on opposition-held
villages, in what may amount to war crimes. Dozens of those killed —
including children, the disabled and the elderly — were burned alive. At
least one of the gang-rape victims was as young as 6. Opposition troops
were also responsible for killing a number of civilians, and the
investigation identified three individuals who the report says bear the
“greatest responsibility” for the violent incidents the United Nations
documented.

South Sudanese troops raped and killed hundreds in recent attacks, U.N. investigation finds

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Qatar donated $250,000 to some of the most extreme pro-Israel
organizations in the United States, including one that funds senior
Israeli military officers to go on propaganda tours.

Joseph Allaham, a lobbyist working for the Qatari government,
transferred the money through his firm Lexington Strategies in late 2017
and early 2018.

The sums included $100,000 to the Zionist Organization of America
(ZOA), $100,000 to Our Soldiers Speak and $50,000 for Blue Diamond
Horizons, Inc.

Our Soldiers Speak describes itself
as the “vehicle through which the IDF [Israeli army] and the Israeli
National Police dispatch senior officers to select campuses overseas”
and to give “briefings” to members of the US Congress.

Blue Diamond Horizons is a company controlled by Mike Huckabee, the Christian Zionist former governor of Arkansas.

Qatar funded Zionist Organization of America

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Are immigration officials allowed to stop people in places wholly inside the U.S.?

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the federal agency tasked with patrolling the U.S. border and areas that function like a border, claims a territorial reach much larger than you might imagine. A federal law says that, without a warrant, CBP can board vehicles and vessels and search for people without immigration documentation “within a reasonable distance from any external boundary of the United States.” These “external boundaries” include international land borders but also the entire U.S. coastline.

What is a “reasonable distance”?

The federal government defines a “reasonable distance” as 100 air miles from any external boundary of the U.S. So, combining this federal regulation and the federal law regarding warrantless vehicle searches, CBP claims authority to board a bus or train without a warrant anywhere within this 100-mile zone. Two-thirds of the U.S. population, or about 200 million people, reside within this expanded border region, according to the 2010 census. Most of the 10 largest cities in the U.S., such as New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago, fall in this region. Some states, like Florida, lie entirely within this border band so their entire populations are impacted.

Your Rights in the Border Zone