UPDATE: New York Judge Tries to Silence Twitter in Its Ongoing Battle to Protect User Privacy | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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Twitter’s ongoing battle to demand that law enforcement request sensitive user information with a search warrant rather than a subpoena has taken a strange and dangerous turn. An ill-advised order from the judge presiding over the case means that either Twitter must disclose data without a warrant, or risk a potentially expensive contempt of court citation.

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Freedom Not Fear: Creating a Surveillance-Free Internet | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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This September 14th-17th, concerned European Internet users will descend on Brussels to participate in an international week of action against invasive surveillance initiatives. Events will also be staged in Luxembourg and Sydney. Freedom Not Fear’s slogan: Stop the surveillance mania!

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We just received an email from the USTR indicating that they are going to cut down the already inadequate 15-minute time allotment for our stakeholder presentation, to a mere eight minutes. In addition, they will all be held in four separate rooms. So not only will the presenters have barely any time to discuss their specific concerns with the agreement, it will literally be impossible for negotiators to attend all the presentations they would be interested in hearing since they will all be held simultaneously in different locations. Moreover, this entire round of negotiations will last 10 full days, and so it seems especially odd that they would need to cut down time for public participation this drastically.

TPP Countdown: USTR Whittles Away at Remaining Trace of Public Participation

TPP Creates Legal Incentives For ISPs To Police The Internet. What Is At Risk? Your Rights. | Electronic Frontier Foundation

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The draft chapter of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement on Intellectual Property—as of its current leaked version [PDF], article 16—insists that signatories provide legal incentives for Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to privately enforce copyright protection rules. The TPP wants service providers to undertake the financial and administrative burdens of becoming copyright cops, serving a copyright maximalist agenda while disregarding the consequences for Internet freedom and innovation.

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